Smells Like Team Spirit

Social media communication between, clubs, players and fans is common in today’s game and when things are going well it’s great, but when things aren’t going so well on the pitch it can be a dark dark place.

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One of the many ways football has changed even in the last decade has been the advent of social media. It is a tool for two way communication – for fans to communicate with players, and for players to communicate with fans; but there are no filters, either way.

From the players side, there are countless stories like the one where Joleon Lescott “accidentally tweeted a picture of his expensive car from his pocket whilst driving” following a bad result (for anyone who has a smartphone, which is pretty much everyone, the phones aren’t that ‘smart’), which do nothing the make players more relatable to fans, or to dampen the stereotype that some players don’t care about clubs, results or performances. However, something Blackburn Rovers have got very right is social media and building that relationship and communication between players and fans – bridges that needed to be re-built following years of mistrust and silence. We are now accustomed daily videos tweeted by the club, and general banter between the players on twitter visible to all.

As with all clubs and players, following every game we get the obligatory tweets from players about how happy/disappointed they are with the result, and always how amazing the fans where (again). I used to think this was a standard post sat in every players draft box ready for posting at 5pm every Friday (minus the “say something like” faux pas made famous by Victor Anichebe), but I, probably like fans of every club, have been suckered in to thinking that Rovers players do actually care and they do notice the support and care about the result and performance – call me an optimist, or an idiot (you decide).

I feel at Ewood Park we really do have a good team spirit and this is outwardly visible through both the individuals posts on Twitter and Instagram, and also there demeanour and attitudes toward the club and each other on the content posted by official club channels; I just don’t think you can fake it that much, so often, you’d get caught out at some point. Look at the jokes and comments between the likes of Dack, Armstrong and Chapman, and the videos and photographs of players heading to Las Vegas after the promotion last season – there is a real team spirit there, and a team spirit which ha probably influenced the likes of Armstrong and Chapman resigning for the club on permanent deals.

The club have definitely rebuilt that social media bridge and the outcome has been incredibly positive, impacting performances and results on the pitch. But it is a two way thing.

After a victory, social media is a bright and shiny happy place with players high-fiving each other, sharing videos of goals; and fans talking of how far a team can go this season, how good a player is and players on their performances. But visit Twitter after a loss and it is a very dark place indeed. Gone on the high fives and congratulations, replaced by tweets about where we are poor and need to strengthen, what the faults of the team are and even tweets aimed at specific players to tell them how poor they have been (regardless of the praise sent their way the last time the team won).

In the 12 hours following defeat, Twitter may be the darkest footballing place on the planet. Players know when they have been poor and I truly believe they know when they have not got what they should from a game. The last thing they need is a teenage brat with a sense of entitlement telling them they were poor and how they need to find a new club. The amount of times I have come away from a defeat and thought “yes we’ve got beat which is disappointing, but I don’t think I could ask anymore of the players and their efforts”, only to head on to Twitter to be confronted by ‘fans’ who must have watched a different game.

The dangerous thing with social media is people only post when they are either elated with joy, or upset with something – there is not middle ground. The other problems with Twitter are that a large percentage of active users is 25 to 34 year olds, and the ability to send any content of 280 characters to anyone with an account. Hypothetically speaking, a 5 year old who has never attended a football match in their life, or know what football even is, could send a message to a young professional footballer,who may be low on confidence anyway, and tell them they are the worst player they have ever seen and they have no future in the game.

Fans at Ewood have become so used to winning ways under Tony Mowbray that they have a sense of entitlement that we should be winning every game; tie that in with an underlying feeling of some fans that we are still the Jack Walker-built team of the nineties and we should in the upper echelons of the Premier League, and after a loss (even a first defeat in 5) if you only logged on Twitter to see how the game had gone you would think we had waved a white flag when the first whistle was blown, the players hadn’t broke sweat and relegation was a certainty. In reality, we are a team newly promoted from the 3rd tier still finding our feet in a higher division, sat 15 points above relegation with 14 games to go – a bit of realism and reflection is what is needed after full time, not a full blown Twitter rant about how unrealistic expectations aren’t being met.

Social media is a two way thing. From a players point of view, you come off the pitch having given everything, and let’s say we’ve been sucker punched by a late goal or on the end of a bad refereeing decision; you get back in the dressing room, shower, change and pull out your phone only to see tweets like: “x isn’t good enough”, “x isn’t fit to wear the shirt” or “that performance is disgraceful”. More than likely the impact is going to be negative and potential affect future performances and attitude, and worse still, impact upon that great team spirit. It is very short minded from the so called fans to vent that frustration.

It’s not too long ago at Blackburn Rovers that we had an endless line of loan mercenaries with no real interest for who they played for just that they got some game time whilst they were unwanted by their parent clubs; at one time there were so many so many at the club it was difficult to remember who we owned and who we didn’t, and very few of them made any lasting impact. Things are different now and we have players at the club who want to be here and are working together with a common goal of making us a better team and moving us up the league.

A case in point regarding the idiocy in Twitter was after the Reading game midweek – yes it is a game we should have won on paper, but history tells us these are the sort of games (where the opposition hasn’t won for months) that we do lose, and you don’t win games on paper. If you’d logged on to Twitter after the game you would have thought we hadn’t turned up and that we’d been outplayed and outmuscled. When, in fact, we were the far better team for 75-80 minutes, but undone by a late goal in the first half and then a quick counter late in the second after equalising. Mowbray’s team selection dropping Dack, Graham and Reed has been questioned, but in my opinion the decision to take Dack and Graham out and play with a central three in midfield and use Armstrong’s pace over the top worked in the first half as we dominated the game for large spells, but could fashion a clear cut chance or take the half chances that fell to us. Conceding right on half time a was a killer – the defending for the goal was poor, but it was the only time in the half they had a sniff. Then we have to change it in the second half to get back in to it, which we ultimately do, but by which stage we are so attack-focussed one decent cross field ball tears us open and a very good punch suckers us once again. Mowbray was right in saying he was be,used we got nothing out of the game as we did boss it for large parts, but just couldn’t fashion the chances. We haven’t had a great record away from home all season, but the win at Millwall looked to be a blueprint for the performance on Wednesday, opting for bodies in the middle to prevent the threat and then the pace of Armstrong, Conway and Brereton on the counter, and I honestly believe if we’d got to half time either level or ahead we would have gone on the win the game, brining Dack off the bench for creativity late on in th same way we brought Armstrong and his pace on at Millwall. Don’t be fooled by twitter reports of an “appalling” or “disgraceful” performance, it most definitely was not, it’s just as happens so often in football, the team that deserves to win does not.

For now we sit 14th in the league, 15 points above relegation with 14 games to go. There has been talk of play offs but this season is about survival and building for next season when a play off run may be more realistic and prepared for. We need to finish the season positively both on and off the pitch to enable us to build for next year, so if you’ve got negative thoughts after a game, leave your phone at home and go for a beer rather than venting on social media.

Author: roversge86

Lifelong Blackburn Rovers fan having held a season ticket for as long as I've been able to walk. Present at Wembley when Rovers beat Leicester to win promotion to the inaugural Premier League; at Anfield on the day we won the league; at Deepdale the night we got promoted back to the Premier League; at the Millennium Stadium the Sunday we won the Worthington Cup. Also there to witness relegation from the Premier League following defeats against Manchester United at Ewood in 1999, and  Wigan in 2012; and further suffering in the Championship from 2012-17. Follow me on Twitter at @glennentwistle

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