He scores when he wants…. but he does so much more

Danny Graham is enjoying an Indian Summer in his career, but are Blackburn Rovers too reliant on the 33 year old….

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Rovers currently sit 10th in the Championship, just 1 point outside of the play-offs, as we head in to the second International break of the season, and have lost just two of their opening 12 games. If you’d offered me that I would have snapped your hands off. It is a great start, but in the Championship, the 3 games-a-week slog means that you can quite easily fly up, or down, the table in the space of 7 days, so Rovers fans shouldn’t get carried away. However, having said that, Rovers have conceded late on more than one occasion this season to change 3 points in to 1 – if we’d held on to leads against Ipswich, Villa and Forest we would have another 6 points tallied up and be sitting in second place; but we mustn’t be picky, 10th place with only 2 losses in the opening 12 games in a fantastic return for any team, let alone one only recently promoted in to the division. What is a concern though is how reliant Rovers are on a 33 year old Danny Graham.

I’ll be honest – I didn’t think he would stay when we dropped in to League 1; and when we started the season with a flurry of goals from Dominic Samuel, I thought he would be surplus to requirements, too much of an expensive luxury. But he has proved me wrong. Instead of sulking about being on the bench in a league below what he had become accustomed to, he dug deep, gained his place back and became a key part of that promotion season, and is again showing his value to the club this season.

Looking at his career statistics, he has never been a phenomenal goalscorer, averaging a goal every 3 and a half games over his 475 game career. What he brings to the Rovers side is an incredible work-rate, especially for a player of his age. At 33 he chases down every ball, every goalkeeper passing out from the back and he challenges for every header. When a team plays against Danny Graham they know they have had a game. How he lasts 90 minutes at the intensity he does, at least once or twice every week is incredible – he must be cryogenically frozen after every game and then defrosted again ahead of the next. The work-rate he brings to the Rovers side is key to the way we play – he presses the defence and hassles every ball to win it back higher up the pitch; he wins the headers; and he drags defenders out of position, providing the gaps for the likes of Dack and Armstrong to capitalise. If you look at Nuttall, the 21 year old has showed some much promise for the Development Squad and in flashes for the first team last year, but he is a completely different player to Graham – he doesn’t chase balls down and you get the impression he needs the ball to him in front of goal to do something with it, he’s 12 years younger than Graham but he does half as much running. Dominic Samuel was very much the same at the start of last season but he was adopting the 100 miles an hour approach when he was ruled out for the season. We don’t really know what Brereton is like or capable of at the minute given we’ve only seem him in small chunks. If a 33 year old Danny Graham experiencing an Indian Summer isn’t enough to get inspire the younger players to follow the same approach, I don’t know what will.

What this does mean though is that Rovers have become somewhat dependant on a player who is aged 33 years and who no-one else in the squad is currently. He affects the way we play so much through his effort in chasing balls down, challenging and winning headers or free-kicks moving us up the pitch, and his efforts to bring other players in to the game. He doesn’t get the goals himself, but without him, we’d struggle to get goals from elsewhere on the pitch. When Graham doesn’t play and we have to rely on the likes of Armstrong or Nuttall up front on their own we don’t get the same hold-up play and it becomes and easier day for the oppositions defence, and an easier day for them to control games and start attacks – home or away – as shown in the Derby away game. Brereton isn’t mentioned here again because I don’t think we have seen enough of him to get a representative sample of the way he plays and what he can offer the team. Maybe he is another Danny Graham-type warhorse, but from the glimpses we have seen we will have to play a different way to get the most out of him, and for him to bring the most out of the team. At the minute Brereton is the Plan B when Mowbray wants to try something different, or when Graham just has nothing left in the tank – saying he is the Plan B is critical because ‘he’ is the Plan B, not the system we play we he comes on; that stays the same as had Graham still been leading the line, and the evidence shows Brereton is a different type of player.

Ben Brereton is not Danny Graham. That doesn’t mean he is a bad player, he is just a different player. He hasn’t been helped by the £6m loan-to-buy deal, which saw him become one of the clubs most expensive players in history, and he hasn’t been helped by being thrown on to win games – he is still only 19 after-all. I’ve seen enough though to think that he can work for Blackburn and that £6m will turn out to be money well spent. The shouts from the stands that he isn’t good enough and that we need to send him back are not needed and they help no-one. He isn’t Danny Graham and at 19 years old he offers a lot more movement than Graham off the ball when we have it. Graham is very much a target man – get it up to him and he will make it stick, he isn’t the type of player to latch on to a through ball and beat defenders. Brereton’s game, from what I’ve seen, is about movement but movement off the ball, creating space, getting in behind players – this is a totally different proposition to Danny Graham. If you are a player that is used to playing with a forward who is going to be relatively static and expect the ball in to feet or head, changing this to a player who wants the ball played in to space is a completely different way of playing football. Expecting a change like this to be seamless from week to the next is a challenge, to do it mid-way through a game is a massive ask. Brereton also hasn’t benefited from being thrown on as an extra forward but put out wide – he isn’t a winger, the same way Samuel isn’t a winger. He’s put a shift in when he’s played there, but the more game time he gets out of position with less chance to score goals, the greater the weight of not having scored is going to become – I don’t have many criticisms of Mowbray, but player Brereton out wide is one of them, especially when we have the likes of Palmer, Conway, Armstrong, Bennett, Bell etc who could all do a better job.

What Brereton could have done with was an extended run in the League Cup where we could play him instead of Graham and get used to the way he plays, and the best way to get the best out of him and the team in a competitive environment. Without this he is likely to play second fiddle to Danny Graham and continue to be asked to play a way he isn’t used to, or for a team to adapt the way they play mid-game. Neither of which is ideal and doesn’t make for an immediate impacting Plan B.

Although it was ultimately fruitless against Sheffield United, Brereton’s introduction showed glimpses of his movement – he never stopped trying to get in to good positions, he almost tried a bit too hard. The problem we had was that we weren’t getting the ball to him quick enough and by the time we got the ball, looked up and seen the pass it was too late. This lead to Brereton finding himself out wide chasing touches of the ball – this isn’t were we want him, we want facing goal within the width of the 18 yard box. In many ways he reminds of Niko Kalinic who never got a fair crack of the whip at Ewood but showed glimpses when he was given a chance – I only hope we don’t give up on Brereton too soon as we all know what happened to Kalinic (despite missing a World Cup Final due to a falling out off the pitch he has played for Fiorentina and AC Milan since leaving Rovers and currently plays for a small Spannish team called Atletico Madrid). The fans need to stick with him and get behind him and I think the goals will come, along with a return on the investment.

But for now, we have Danny Graham. A player who not only scores when he wants – which is about once every four games – but he creates the opportunities for Dack and the rest of the team to shine.