Monthly Archives: August 2018

Give Him The Keys

 

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The last seven days have epitomised what Blackburn Rovers have become under the stewardship of Tony Mowbray – and he should be thanks by both club and town.

The last seven days have seen a 7 point return from three Championship games, taking Blackburn Rovers’ total to 9 from the 5 games played this season so far. Rovers remain unbeaten since their return to the Championship and the 9 points gained are from a possible 15, and put them in fifth place in the division. In many ways, the last seven days have shown what the team are all about under Tony Mowbray – winning away from home; coming back from two goals down at home with players going off injured, and grinding out a one nil win to beat a promotion favourite despite a depleted squad.

In years gone by an away trip to Hull would have been a tough ask which the best we would hope for would be a draw – our away form during our previous stay in the Championship was dreadful. But now we are taking the game to teams on the road – we should have won on the opening day away to Ipswich, and by all accounts we were well worth our win at the KCOM last week.

Then midweek against Reading, no-one can deny we were very poor in the first half and the two goal deficit at half time looked an up-hill struggle – especially considering there was no Dack or Palmer in the side, and Armstrong and Samuel were lost to injury during the game. Yet the team spirit was evident and the never-say-die attitude shone through to salvage a point – and if the game had gone on another 5-10 minutes there’s a good chance we could have found a winner. In years gone by being 2-0 down at home would have turned in to three or four as the crowd would get on the players backs and the players would go in to their shell. That’s not the case with Mowbrays men – they never know when they are beaten; and that’s reflected in the crowd – even at two nil down on Wednesday I felt the game wasn’t over and we could get something. In previous years once the team went behind, especially by two goals, the crowd would have turned ugly, got on the players backs and turned their frustrations to the owners once again. But all that has changed under Mowbray – when was the last time the ‘V’ word was heard from the stands at Ewood?

The win against Brentford yesterday once again summed up the battling attitude of the side. Brentford are an established Championship side who every year seem capable of making the play-off party and without the likes of Dack, Armstrong and Samuel, the game looked a tough ask – I would’ve happily taken a point. A scrappy first half played in to Rovers hands as they could get stuck in and not let Brentford implement and enforce their style, but after the hour mark, with the crowd behind them, Blackburn took the lead and pressed for another. It took the once again magnificent Raya to keep a clean sheet to take all three points, but the shear effort and workmanship from the side was what won the game – I have no idea how Elliott Bennett has the energy to walk of the pitch after 90 minutes as more often than not he has covered every blade of grass twice over. He epitomises everything that Rovers are now about. We used to be a soft touch, easy for oppositions to impose their game upon – but not any more, we battle for every ball and get on the front foot at the earliest opportunity – which in turn gives the fans something to should about. We don’t expect to see worldies every week or players being 5 or 6 men before firing in to the top-corner, but the least we do expect is effort, and we getting that in abundance every week.

In the past I’ve argued that we didn’t have a style or a way of playing – it was a case of play the ball out and pass it sideways waiting for something to open up or for a set piece; if we lost the ball we’d be more focussed on getting back in position than hassling and harrying for the ball further up the pitch. Now we attack with pace and good link up play in the centre of the park, and if the balls lost we are the oppositions faces straight away – all leading to us winning the ball further up the pitch, spending more time in the oppositions half, and taking the pressure off our defence.

Tony Mowbray started at Rovers at one of the most important times in the clubs history and he very nearly avoided relegation to League One. Upon relegation some would have skulked and sulked and even turned down the task but what Mowbray has done is create a fantastic team spirit and work ethic with players who want to run that extra yard and who want to get the club back were it belongs. With a different manager it could all have been so different and we could’ve now found ourselves still languishing in League One or worse. To put it in simple terms, Tony Mowbray is very much a saviour of the club. In my lifetime I’d say the three most important managers have been Kenny Dalglish, Tony Mowbray and Graeme Souness in that order. Dalglish was important because he was the right man to utilise Jack Walkers money to establish the club in the top flight and fight for honours – another manager may not even have been able to get us out of the old second division; and if we hadn’t gone up then, we may never have gone up and disappeared in to obscurity. In many ways, he and Jack Walker put the town of Blackburn on both a UK and world map. The importance of Tony Mowbray speaks for itself – without him who knows where we would be both on and off the pitch. And finally, I think Graeme Souness took over at a time similar to Mowbray, were it could have been easy to settle for the Championship, especially following the loss of Jack Walker. But he built a good side that gained promotion and pushed on from there and also delivered a major trophy – all at a time when money was becoming more and more important and spendings becoming more and more expensive. Without spending vast sums of money he created a very competitive Rovers side and set the foundations for the next decade. If we hadn’t gone up that season we might never have gone back up. It’s just a shame how his reign ended, but it did lead to a bright five years with Mark Hughes at the helm.

Mowbrays record at Blackburn speaks for itself since taking over in February 2017: we are now 6 games unbeaten; we have only lost one game in the last 21; we’ve only lost 2 games in the last 40; and we have only lost 6 games in the last 56; and add to that, Rovers are now unbeaten in 23 games at Ewood Park. We currently site on 9 points for the season after five games – in our last division in the Championship in 2016-17 it took us until the middle of October to reach this tally – it’s not even the end of the first month of the season yet. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying we are nailed or for promotion or should even be thinking about that – but the sooner we get to the other side of 40 points the better, then we can start looking up towards the play-offs.

The signing of Jack Rodwell has raised a few eyebrows this week and initially I thought it a bit of a crazy stupid signing – but that is only considering his stay at Sunderland and his phenomenal wages. For the Mackems he cost £10m and was on a reported £70,000 a week wage, and during his spell there he went 1,370 days without winning a Premier League game. It looks like a gamble, but when you look at his career as whole he is still only 27; he has represented England 3 times at senior level; and he was obviously good enough for Manchester City to spend £12m on him. He won’t be on anywhere near the £70k a week at Ewood – I’d expect him to be on 10-20% of that at most, and it is only a one year deal – so if Mowbray can get him putting in the performances which saw him come to prominence at Everton he has got a bargain. His work ethic has been questioned most recently in the past by Chris Coleman at Sunderland – but with the group we have already at Ewood, and the fact Mowbray has told him he has to earn his place in the team, he will not be allowed to have the wrong attitude. I have faith in Mowbray to either get the best out of him, or to see he is a basket-case and keep him from harming the spirit within the group.

In my eyes Mowbray deserves to be recognised for what he has done for the club and the town to date. Without him we might not even have a football club any more – but not only has he steadied the ship when it needed righting the most, he has pushed us on to the next level and improved us remarkably. The fans are back on side with a spring in their step on a Monday morning – no longer are we a joke in footballing circles, and no longer do we have to moan about Venkys; we can say with pride we are on our way back. The keys to the town is the least that Mowbray deserves for what he has done. And as for Venkys, they owe him a great deal more – he’s turned headless chickens playing for a club run by prized turkeys in to a side who could rule the roost of the north-west clubs in the Championship this season.

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Deja Vu

Newly promoted Wolverhampton Wanderers spent over €72m on new signings during the Summer transfer window but there was something familiar about the business they did and how they did it.

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Over the last two years Wolves have spent something in the region of €65m on players either of Portuguese nationality, or represented by the super agent Jorge Mendes. The list of arrivals over the last two years also includes the Wolves Manager Nuno Espirito Santo, who was Mendes first client as a football agent. The influx of Portuguese signings and the involvement of Mendes has come about since the club from the Black Country was bought by Fosun International, the Chinese investors conglomerate; with Mendes reportedly helping to identify Wolves as a prospect to buy, and there being a business partnership between Mendes and Fosun. Another link between the two is a company called Shanghai Foyo, which is majority owned by Fosun’s chairman, Guo Guanchang, which bought stakes in “Start”, the holding company for Mendes’ Gestifute agency. Mendes’ Gestifute agency represented the Midlands club via a Portuguese agent (Valdir Cardosa) in the deal with Monaco for Ivan Cavaleiro in 2017, where Cavaleiro was represented by Carlos Osorio de Castro. The same Carlos Osorio de Castro then represented Helder Costa in his move from Monaco to Molineux, with Cardosa representing Wolves. No issue here until you see that Osorio de Castro is believed to have acted as Gestifute’s lawyer for many years1.

Exchange the names of Mendes, de Castro and Cardosa and the company Gestifute with Jerome Anderson, SEM, Kentaro and Crescendo and it all sounds a bit too familiar to Blackburn Rovers fans. Cold sweats will likely follow as many Rovers fans hold these people fully responsible for the turmoil the club has been through over the last 7 years.

Since Fosun International bought Wolves back in July 2016 for £45m, they have bought no fewer than nine players represented by either Mendes or his Gestifute agency, for over a staggering €50m, with a significant amount spent during the 2016-17 and 17-18 seasons in the Championship. In simple terms, Mendes helped Fosun International identify Wolves as a suitable club to purchase, and since said purchase he has entered in to a business partnership with Fosun, and since then, over €50m-worth of players represented by his management agency have been bought by Wolves. He does not own the players, he merely represents them, but the sheer volume of his clients bought by Wolves, and his involvement with the club does seem somewhat unethical, and if not unethical, definitely unhealthy. The first place Wolves will go when looking for a new signing will be Mendes – if he doesn’t have a financial stake in the club, something where decisions on player transfers affecting performance and results could affect profit and loss to him – it is a very risky and trusting venture from Fosun International. One has to expect that the “business partnership” between Mendes and Fosun is dependant on the provision of the quality of the players, not the quantity of players.

Step back in time to November 2010 when Venkys bought a 99.9% stake in Blackburn Rovers for £23m. Venkys employed sports rights agency Kentaro, who had a corporate partnership with Jerome Anderson’s SEM Group, in very much the same way that Fosun International engaged with Mendes: to find a suitable a club to buy; and following the purchase, to assist with transfer strategy for Rovers with their in-house agents who deal with talent management. The similarities, at least for now, end there. Instead of signing established household names like Moutinho or Patricio, or signing promising youngsters like Wolves have done, Blackburn embarked on 2 years of promising global superstars but delivering unknown youngsters or family relations. After spending a rumoured £1.6m in agents fees for Barcelona’s Reuben Rochina in their first transfer window in charge (when Anderson allegedly had no say in transfer dealings, but was rumoured to have slept at the training ground), in the summer of 2012 Rovers bought no less than six Portuguese players for a around £100k, yet paid £864k in agents fees to Nuno Rolo, Carlos Mendes and Marcos Oliveira. On top of that, in the period between Venkys purchase of the club in 2010 and the of summer 2012, Sam Allardyce had been sacked and replaced by relatively unknown coach and Jerome Anderson represented Steve Kean, followed by Jerome Anderson represented assistant manager John Jensen, and perhaps most worryingly, Anderson was joined by his son Myles in 2011. A 21 year old with one appearance to his name for Aberdeen, with no Premier League experience, signing via a pre-contract agreement, for a well-established Premier League club where his father was not involved in the day to day running of the club but had a business relationship with the clubs owners; despite having previously failed to impress during a trial the previous summer, the summer before Venkys bought the club assisted by Anderson. Nepotism? Absolutely. Unethical? Most definitely. Rule breaking? The FA obviously thought something was going on as they investigated between 2011-2013. If I was a Wolves fan I’d be looking at Jorge Mendes’ family tree to see if he might try and pull a similar stunt (I’ve checked, he has a son called Jorge Mendes Junior, but there are no hints at his footballing ability).

Back in April 2013 it was reported that the FAs Head of Integrity had been investigating Rovers for more than two years, looking at the takeover of the club as well as control of the club and the involvement of agents and advisers2. Rovers response was that there was no contractual or customary arrangements, whether formal or informal, with SEM Ltd and/or Kentaro and/or any other company in the Kentaro AG Group; they did however confirm that Venkys did have an agreement with Kentaro under which they provided consultancy services to Venkys in respect of football related business. In the end nothing came of this as Anderson maintained he had no involvement in the running of the club, but there’s no smoke without fire, and if the FA looked in to Anderson’s involvement in Rovers, if the rules haven’t changed, they must be keeping an eye on the goings on at Wolves – if anything they are far more blatant with their activity. On the topic of Anderson and the FA investigation, as a side note it is worth remembering that Anderson was cosy with David Dein during his time as the as the Vice President between 2000-04 and Anderson himself was licensed as an FA intermediary; likewise, Kentaro had dealings with the FA in 2009 as part of selling the broadcast rights to an England World Cup Qualifier with Ukraine.

The link between Mendes and the players signed by Wolves is clear and obvious, but the link between Rovers and the players signed in the summer of 2012 is not. The only visible links are the use of the same agents to broker the deals, the payments received by the agents for the deals, and strangely the signing of Nuno Henrique. At the time Rovers bought Henrique, I, like most Rovers fans, assumed Henrique to be another youngster from Portugal that Rovers were hoping would blossom in to a star – he wasn’t. He was a 25 year old defender plying his trade at Portuguese Primeira Liga side Academica; by plying his trade, he had made just 2 appearances for Academica that season, and 7 the season before that for Feirense, other than that the majority of his football had been played in the Portuguese Segunda for Aves and Fafe. On paper he doesn’t scream “suitable for a promotion push”, and on the field he obviously didn’t either as he never made a first team appearance for Rovers. He was a strange signing – the only connection I can find between him and Rovers is that Steve Kean, manager at the time, played for Academica between 1988-1991. However, Henrique was represented by the agent Marcos Oliveira, who also represented Edinho Junior, Diogo Rosado and Grego Sandomierski who were also brought in that summer (with hefty agents fees paid) – so maybe I’m trying to read too much in to this, and it is merely a case of him being recommended by an agent already being used for multiple deals for hefty fees. Of the players brought in that summer in 2012, they made a combined total of 30 appearances for the club, with veteran Nuno Gomes being responsible for more than half of those on his own (18).

The situation at Wolves is very similar to the one at Ewood between 2010 and arguably the end of the Owen Coyle reign, and if I was a Wolves fan I’d be concerned over Mendes involvement in the club. It might be rosy now his signings have got them back to the Premier League and he looks to have brought in some good players, but at what cost? And what happens should they not do the job and relegation happens? What contracts are they on? Is Nuno Espirito Santo too comfortable given his relationship with Mendes given Mendes’ relationship with Fosun International? It’s only when things go wrong than you see the cracks appear and see what devastation lies behind them cracks – look at Blackburn Rovers: after being bought by the Venkys with alleged agent involvement, they stayed up that season (ironically thanks to a victory against Wolves on the last day of the season), were relegated the next and were then unable to get back to the top flight before being related to League One in 2017 – from Premier League security to League One in just 7 years, and riddled with debt just for good measure. Wolves have been to League One in recent years and Blackburn will be hoping to follow their steps back to the Premier League, so Wolves should be all too aware of the dangers of mismanagement. The FA also need to pay close attention – they did nothing to help Rovers when their fans asked for help and as a result the club was run in to the ground and almost in to administration; I’d hope if Wolves fans had a similar plight they would respond better. They also need to be clear on expectations on agents involvement at clubs – Mendes role is very murky water, but it is a role which oversees massive financial deals both for Wolves and his Clients. If he was to walk away tomorrow, Wolves then struggled and got relegated with his Clients on long term contracts for large wages, would the FA sit back and argue that Fosun International had been ‘fit and proper’ in their running of the club? Could Mendes be classed as a third party? If not, he must be classed as part of the club, in which case he is part of a process which agrees player wages (and other things) for both the club and the player, which doesn’t seem right.

References:
1https://www.theguardian.com/football/2017/jun/19/jorge-mendes-wolves-influence-chinese-owners-signings
2http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2308641/Nick-Harris-FA-investigate-Blackburn-Rovers.html

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